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Charles A Veley's Posts
Charles A has posted 17 reports and 100 photos.

Existing reports and photos: (Mouseover any camera icon for sample images. Click on any camera icon for all images)
 

Afghanistan Visit: -


Annobon Visit: 2005-1
2009-10-05 - Annobon has an airport (a runway, anyway). There is a flight from Malabo (SSG) most Saturdays on the airline GEASA, although this is unpredictable. On the Friday I investigated this, no one at the Malabo airport knew anything about flights to Annobon, yet the next morning, check-in was happening, with a cardboard sign for Annobon taped above the counter. Domestic airline executives and pilots in Equatorial Guinea are nearly all Kazakh Russians, and the executive in charge at GEASA is Misha, whose cellphone is local number 203 283. This seems to be the only way to get good flight information or reserve a ticket. The price is negotiable - cash only, of course - because there are no seats on the Antonov aircraft. Passengers climb in the cargo hold from the rear and sit on boxes or on the floor... Prior to flying, one must obtain a permit from the Department of the Interior in Malabo. Without this permit, a foreigner will be detained by police at the Annobon airstrip and asked to return on the same aircraft.

Ashmore and Cartier Islands Visit: -


Baker Island (and Howland Island) Visit: 2008-8
2009-10-03 - On August 6, ten people left Apia, Samoa on a one-off expedition on the R/V Bounty Bay. There were 3 Fijian crew, 3 scientists (including Jim Maragos, a leading coral reef specialist and manager for the US Fish and Wildlife Service), and 4 paying passengers/tourists (including myself). This was one of the few voyages ever to bring civilians to Baker and Howland Islands.

The Bounty Bay was an slow and uncomfortable catamaran, with bunks along the wall in each pontoon. There was very little airflow below, which made for many miserable hours onboard.

We reached Baker Island after 15 days at sea, and made a beach landing from an inflatable zodiac. Because there had been substantial US Military activity there in WWII, the reef was blasted away in a couple of spots, so landing and departing was relatively easy (especially compared to Howland). The island was more or less oval-shaped, with a 20m crushed coral beach rising about 5 meters to a grassy interior filled with birds. The runway had crossed the island on a east-west orientation, but the entire interior of the island was overgrown, making the exact runway location difficult to assess (especially since we were asked not to walk on the interior). However, six radio towers remained standing at what looked to be the east (windward) end of the runway.

Three of the passengers walked around the perimeter of Baker, finding hermit crabs, spiders, birds, and a the odd lizard or two, as well as the ruins of two American landing craft. The day beacon which stood approximately 20 feet tall was filled with hermit crabs, as was nearly any other shady spot on the island!

Howland Island is less than 40 miles from Baker, but differs in several ways: First, it is long and thin, and oriented north-south, so is suitable only for a very short runway, as the prevailing trade winds are east-west. Although a runway was prepared on Howland for Amelia Earhart's arrival, there is no evidence of its location, and it is very difficult to understand why Howland would have been chosen over Baker as a suitable landing spot for an airplane. In fact, no airplane has ever landed on Howland Island, although an American seaplane crashed near the island long ago and sits in pieces on the shore.

Secondly, Howland was never settled extensively, so retains its full surrounding reef, and accompanying surf break. Whereas landing over the reef on the leeward side in the direction of the surf is normally possible, departing through the break is very difficult, even at high tide. Our party had significant problems navigating an inflatable zodiac through the break, because of the strength of the break, and the sharp, irregular coral. Three strong men were whipped around like rag dolls, our legs scraped and cut, and I was at point forced under the boat. This because two people in the party could not swim, and had to be transported by boat. It would have been much easier, although dangerous in itself, to swim through the break.

Because of the difficulties in that departure, a decision was made to postpone further rescues until high tide. Therefore two of the landing party were stranded on the island for 9 hours, resulting in extensive sunburn.

As for nature on the island, birdlife on Howland is thriving as it is on Baker. Hermit crabs and lizards are also present, although less numerous than on Baker. Howland also has several low scrub trees (about 10' tall), while Baker has none. These trees do not provide shade, however, as their leaves are sparse, and they are filled with nesting boobies. Earhart Light is the major landmark, and, although not functional, is in relatively good condition.

Prior to landing on both Baker and Howland Island, FWS asked that all passengers deep-clean their clothes (including shoes), then place them in a freezer for 24 hours. This was to prevent the introduction into these pristine environments of alien organisms such as seeds or bacteria




Banaba Island Visit: 2004-3
2007-05-28 - Banaba, or Ocean Island is a small, phosphorus-producing island near the Equator in the Western Pacific. Today, it is part of Kirbati, but Banaba is geographically distinct from the Gilberts, and Banabans have always had a separate language and culture from Gilbert Islanders.

In the early 20th century, Britain annexed Banaba to the Gilbert & Ellice Islands because of its commercial potential. Banabans suffered as the center of their island was completely excavated, then again when they were invaded and occupied by the Japanese during WWII. Following the war, all Banabans were resettled to Rabi, a distant island in Fiji. But a small group returned to their homeland, and now roughly 300 Banabans live in the rusting mining infrastructure.

Banaba is serviced 1-2 times per month by Kiribati cargo ships from Tarawa. It is a 30-hour sailing from Tarawa. Charles arrived with the Banaba DXpedition of 2004, in a freighter called the Te Taobe. The natives told the group that they were the first white people on the island in 5 years.




Chechnya Visit: 2005-8
2007-05-28 - Chechnya is an Autonomous Republic of Russia located in the northern foothills of the Caucasus mountains. Because of the rugged terrain, and history of violence and criminal activity in the area, Chechnya has historically been the most dangerous place in the most dangerous region of Russia. Currently, police, army and Chechen rebels operate in a complex web of shifting alliances and organized crime, with ubiquitous checkpoints throughout the region, making it nearly impossible for a foreigner to even approach Chechnya, let alone enter, without a full military escort.

The safest large city near Chechnya is Vladikavkaz, capital of North Ossetia. The main road from Vladikavkaz to Chechnya passes through Nazran and Ingushetia. However, due to heavy security, and the presence of armed gangs, it is inadvisable to use this road when traveling privately. On the opposite side of Chechnya lies Dagestan, which is often just as dangerous, and so an approach from the East is inadvisable. There is no legal border crossing between Chechnya and the Republic of Georgia, although terrorists have in the past used the rugged mountain trails to occupy small villages in the Pankisi Gorge area of Georgia. Assistance in counterterrorism in the Pankisi area is the primary tactical reason that the US military has given for its presence in Georgia. The safest border area to Chechnya lies to the northwest. If already in North Ossetia, there is a small border post east of the town of Mozdok. The Russian army staff there are friendly and will not ask for bribes, which is almost unheard of in the region. They will however, call in the KGB to interview any foreigners, so one should be prepared for that. If one has not yet entered North Ossetia, it might be better to approach Chechnya by flying to Mineraly Vody, and traveling by land to the main road/rail border at Terek. Of course, this all assumes that the traveler has a valid visa to travel freely within Russia. Normal Russian tourist visas must specify exact dates and locations of travel, and cities anywhere in the Caucasus, let alone Chechnya, will normally not be approved. The easiest way to get around this is to obtain a Russian Tourist Visa Support Letter, which eliminates the need to show specific hotel reservations and other travel plans in advance of obtaining a visa. For non-Russian speakers, it is also highly recommended to travel with a Russian-speaking guide who is familiar with the region. For travel within Russia, Charles uses Mikhail "Misha" Rybochkin, a former paratrooper and current translator.




Chesterfield Islands Visit: 2004-12
2009-11-22 - The Chesterfield Islands are a remote island group nearly halfway between New Caledonia and Australia. For a few years, I searched for a way to cross between the two, in order to visit Mellish Reef and Chesterfields on the same run but it was too expensive and logistically challenging, due to distance, fuel, and customs requirements. Finally, I agreed to charter a sportfishing boat, the Quo Vadis, through Pacific Charters in Noumea.

Quo Vadis is skippered by Olivier Quach, an interesting and accomplished Caledonian of Vietnamese descent. Direct booking can be made through their family business Powercat Charter (www.powercat-charter.com). Olivier's brother Gerald is a bodybuilder who was previously "Mister New Caledonia", and his friend Michel was a Pacific spearfishing champion.

We departed Koumac on the northern tip of the mainland the night of 11 December, 2004, and were among the Chesterfields 36 hours later. Along the way we caught a swordfish, mahi mahi, and a parrotfish, as well as lobster in the lagoon (there was one other fishing boat in the lagoon while we were there).

We landed on Ile du Loop - the southernmost of the Chesterfields, which we knew to have a marker suitable for a photo, but just in case, the Quach brothers had created a handmade sign reading "Welcome to Chesterfields". Ile du Loop was absolutely covered with red-footed boobys, and it was here that I realized the derivation of "booby-trap". Boobies dig nests in the sandy scrub, then camouflage the holes with brush, creating a dangerous zone for walking, with the potential for broken legs at every step!

After a fabulous sashimi and lobster dinner, we set out for Noumea at sunset, arriving 36 hours later to catch high tide through the passage into Koumac. A highlight of the subsequent week in Noumea was dinner at Chez Quach 3 nights later. Many Vietnamese spring rolls and much American whiskey was consumed that night to celebrate our successful Chesterfields expedition.


Clipperton Island Visit: 2003-4
2008-09-24 - Clipperton Island is a remote, uninhabited and barren island 700 miles off the Pacific Coast of Mexico. It is an eerie place, and all who have attempted to settle here have either died, fled, or been driven mad (or some combination of the above). Claimed by France, the island was settled for several years by a Mexican garrison. The story of their subsequent downfall is epic in its drama. During WWII, the US Navy tried and failed to land enough equipment to construct a runway on Clipperton. The island was familiar to the US, since FDR made two fishing trips to the island.Although mainly devoid of scenery, Clipperton is home to abundant bird and sea life. The incessant frightened calls of the nesting boobies drove many visitors mad, as did the ubiquitous beady red-eyed land crabs which hide in the sand during the sunny days, then energe at night to swarm and devour any organic materials they can find. Clipperton is also home to some of the most spectacular tuna fishing in the world. In recent years, it has been visited annually by passenger sportfishing boats out of San Diego, including the Royal Star, Red Rooster, Royal Polaris, and Excel. I visited on the Royal Star, and highly recommend their service, whether or not one is a skilled angler. Landing is difficult, due to the encircling reefs, and the ubiquitous sharks. It is rare that a dinghy can actually land on the beach; the US Navy lost several vessels trying to land during WWII. I had to swim roughly 50M through the surf in order to land, and ruined my camera along the way!


Cocos Island Visit: 2005-5
2007-05-29 - Roughly 300 miles off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, Cocos Island is one of the world's true jewels. Physically, it is an archetypal "tropical island," with dramatic hills, beaches, jungles, and waterfalls. Historically, it has a rich association with pirates and buried treasure, and, most people feel, was the basis for Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. And recreationally, it is one of the world's best dive sites, chock-a-block with an incredible diversity of species.

Cocos is visited by dive liveaboard boats as well as private yachts which have obtained a permit from the Costa Rican government (Cocos is a Costa Rican national park). Charles visited on the ship Sea Hunter, run by the dive company Undersea Hunter. Landings can be made most days while near the island; however, they will be wet landings on the beach, as there is no dock.




Coral Sea Islands Territory Visit: 2003-9
2008-09-24 - The Coral Sea Islands Territory consists of the section of the Pacific Ocean outside of Australian Territorial Waters between Australia, Noumea, and Papua New Guinea. The only populated island within The Coral Sea Islands Territory is Willis Island, which has a permanent weather station staffed with 4 people on 6-month shifts. Several dive companies sail into the Coral Sea Islands Territory; the best being Tusa Dive company in Cairns. I chartered their boat TUSA IV to go to Willis Island, a 12 hour overnight run. The 4 inhabitants of Willis are VERY eager for outside contact, so no permits are necessary to visit. It is advisable to arrange mail delivery for the group before departing from Cairns. Note that, although P&O Cruises advertises that they stop at Willis Island, this is a waste pickup service, and no passengers will be brought ashore.


Egypt (non-Sinai) Visit: 2005-4
2008-05-01 - My first visit to Egypt was in April, 2000. Because of my wife's status as a hotel GM, and our recent complaints about sister property Rajvilas in Jaipur, we were awarded the 2nd biggest suite in the Mena House Oberoi, with 3 bedrooms, for US$75/night. I will never forget looking out at the full moon over the pyramids from our enormous balcony, which was by itself about 50 square meters. The corridor of the suite itself was about 30 meters long.

Ethiopia Visit: -


Franz Josef Land Visit: 2005-7
2007-05-28 - Franz Josef Land is an Arctic archipelago of 191 islands situated roughly 250 miles north of Novaya Zemlya, and 300 miles east-northeast of Svalbard. It is the northernmost land in Russia.

Quark Expeditions attempts to land at Franz Josef twice annually on its North Pole voyages. Additionally, Poseidon has begun offering this service, both on the Yamal and on the Kapitan Dranitsyn. Landing on Franz Josef Land by other means is near impossible. Such a landing is rare even for Russians, requires a special permit, and is restricted to only a few scientists per year.



Greenland Visit: -


Kingman Reef Visit: 2003-10
2007-05-28 - Kingman Reef is a low pile of coral, roughly 400m long and less than 10m wide, rising to roughly 8 feet above sea level at high tide. It has no vegetation, save for coconuts which float 33 miles from Palmyra Atoll, land, sprout, and feed on themselves until dying.

The only way to reach Kingman Reef is by private boat. Bill Austin and the Machias have been there several times. The nearest airstrip is at Palmyra Atoll, available only to donors of at least $100,000 to the Nature Conservancy. Perhaps the island manager would take a group of extreme donors on the day trip from Palmyra to Kingman. Alternately, DXpeditions go to Kingman Reef every 5 years or so.




Malpelo Island Visit: 2005-5
2007-05-29 - Malpelo is a dramatic, barren rock some 300 miles off the Colombian Pacific coast. Six Colombian sailors and marines stand watch on the island, extending Colombia's territorial waters far into the Pacific. These troops have little to do on the desolate islands, and are rotated monthly. Because Malpelo is designated a National Park, a permit must be obtained from the Colombian Ministry of the Environment before landing can be considered. And even if a permit and sea transportation is obtained, landing is still difficult. Because of the sheer cliffs on all sides, the only access is via a steel catwalk drilled into a cliff face. A Colombian Marine will release a rope ladder from the catwalk, and the landing party must jump from his boat onto the rope ladder, climb up to the catwalk, then scramble up a steep rock face (there are no paths) to the shack where the 6 troops live.

The only company visiting Malpelo regularly is the Dive liveaboard company Undersea Hunter. Charles visited Malpelo from the ship Sea Hunter and skipped diving one day in order to land on Malpelo and spend some quality time with the Colombians. Undersea Hunter company was very helpful in working with the Colombian government and obtaining the landing permit on Charles's behalf. For those wishing to make their own arrangements, the permit office is located at: No. 20-30, Carrera 10, 4th floor, Bogota.




Market Reef Visit: 2003-6
2007-05-29 - Market Reef is a tiny island shared between Sweden and Finland in the Bothnian Sea. It is uninhabited, but has an abandoned lighthouse. There is a low stone wall which indicates the international border. Market Reef is said to be the smallest island shared by two nations!

Because Market Reef is on the DXCC list, Finnish DXers visit regularly. So the easiest way would be to tag along with them. Or, if this is not convenient, one can sail (6+ hours) or take a helicopter (20 minutes) starting from Mariehamn, in the Aland islands. Charles chartered the Air Ambulance helicopter from Mariehamn Airport (MHQ). The helicopter company is right next door to the main passenger terminal, and the contact information is: Sk



Nepal (other) Visit: -

New Caledonia (mainland) Visit: -

Phoenix Islands Visit: -


Pitcairn Island Visit: 2009-2
2009-02-27 - I arrived unexpectedly to Pitcairn today, due to a faulty engine on the Bounty Bay. Fellow MTP travelers Veikko Huhtala, Oili Liutu, and Elliot Koch are here for the first time, whereas this is my second visit. I've been surprised to find internet and fast phone service, flush toilets, and extended pavement, all of which is new in the last 7 years since I was here. We are stranded indefinitely until the engine is fixed, but still hope to visit Ducie, Henderson and Oeno on this trip. The voyage has had several twists and turns which will be documented later; we have only been away for 2 days, and have had about 4 changes of plan!

Pukapuka (and Suwarrow) Visit: -


Rockall Visit: 2008-5
2008-11-26 - Rockall is probably the most difficult island to land on in the world, due to its sheer sides and the rough surrounding North Atlantic seas, which create huge swells even in calm conditions. In 2005, I sailed with British TV personality Ben Fogle from Mallaig, Scotland, on the Eda Frandsen (http://www.eda-frandsen.co.uk/) to attempt to land on Rockall, but we turned back in the middle of the night 50 nautical miles away, in the midst of a worsening gale. We spent 2 very nice days at St. Kilda and cruising the Outer Hebrides, but did not approach Rockall. Ben dropped me off at the dock in the tiny outer Hebrides settlement of Leverburgh, and eventually was able to sail back to Rockall the following week, but was unable to land. Ben writes about this adventure in his book "Offshore" (http://www.benfogle.com/books/offshore).

In 2008, I joined "Island Man" Andy Strangeway, 7 other passengers, and 3 crew in Leverburgh to board the Elinca (http://www.beyondthebluehorizon.co.uk/), skippered by Angus Smith . Conditions were ideal for the voyage out; in fact, we had to motor due to lack of wind! Nevertheless, swells at Rockall ranged from 15-20 feet, making approach to the side of the island by dinghy impossible. After waiting all day in vain for the swells to subside, Angus sent out his son Innis with a kayak to investigate more closely. Videographer and erstwhile surf instructor Mark Lumsden accompanied Innis with a surfboard.

Mark astonished us all by bodysurfing the swell towards the rock, then grasping the skirt of kelp, and hauling himself up into a crag in the rock face. Having thus proven the possibility of landing, he climbed to the top and back down, then returned to the ship and gave me his wetsuit to follow. It was difficult, but I landed on the rock! Four other passengers were able to land this way (in sequence, using the same wetsuit) and two of the others were also able to scramble to the top of the rock.

Unfortunately, Andy Strangeway, the organizer, was unable to land in 2008, but the upside for MTP members is that he will organize another attempt in 2009 (http://islandmanrockallexpedition2009.com/).




Swains Island Visit: 2008-8
2008-11-26 - Swains Island is one of the furthest outposts of the United States. Roughly 200 nautical miles north of Apia, Samoa, Swains is a single coral island containing a relatively large freshwater lagoon. Swains has been run since the 19th century by the Jennings Family, who send a representative to sit in the American Samoan Territorial Legislature.

On the M/V Bounty Bay's August 2008 Central Pacific Expedition, we met Alexander Jennings, the current representative, on the beach at Swains Island for all of about 5 minutes. This was because, as we arrived (bringing 2 passengers to caretake on Swains), the entire population of the island was evacuating! A pregnant woman was being moved to hospital, and all of the others (only 9 people at the time) decided they would come too.

Swains was hurt badly by Cyclone Percy in 2005, and the population has decreased since then. Alexander Jennings spoke to us of his plans for expansion and tourism on the island, which did not look promising given his rapid departure! A simple church was the only building left standing in the main village following Percy's passage, although other buildings including at least 2 residences have been repaired, and two new buildings constructed. A communications building with high surrounding wall was under construction at the time of our visit (Currently, the only outside communication capability on the island is a single-sideband radio left behind by a ham radio expedition). All of these buildings are positioned around a wide grassy clearing 100M from the beach.

Prior to his departure, Alex Jennings gave us the keys to the island's only vehicle, a white pickup truck, so that we could more easily reach the other side of the island. Four of us drove through the island's sole jungle trail to the opposite beach, site of the former copra plantation manager's family house, which was now falling down. We also visited the freshwater lagoon, and wondered at Alex's claim that a seaplane could land there and bring tourists. We thought the lagoon a bit small for that.

During the time we were exploring ashore, our two caretaker friends were boiling coconut crabs, which had been caught and saved for our visit. We ate them later onboard, as we made our way towards Nukunonu, Tokelau. Although the Tokelau government considers Swains part of their country, Alex Jennings said nothing about the issue except that he hoped for increased trade with Tokelau.

It is interesting to note that, while it took the Bounty Bay 36 hours to cross from Apia to Swains, the charter transport for the islanders covered the same distance in 9 hours, or 4 times our speed. This was one of our first indications that we were in for a long and tiring voyage across the Central Pacific!



Tokelau Islands Visit: -


Tuva Visit: 2007-8
2009-10-03 - My friend Misha and I drove in a rented Land Rover from Moscow to Vladivostok in 2007, with many twists and turns along the way. The road from Abakan to Kyzyl, the capital of Tuva, was surprisingly good, and we enjoyed the spectacular overlooks of mountains, fields, and forests. However, based on the map, we misjudged the size of a prospective "town" near the border, and shuddered to a stop right at the border marker to Tuva, completely out of fuel. Fortunately, some berry-pickers selling their wares by the roadside allowed us to siphon some of their petrol - enough to make it to Kyzyl. We had beaten up our car enough not to care that the petrol from their old Lada was 80 octane, when ours was supposed to be 95 octane!
No reports or photos on:

Aargau
Abkhazia
Abruzzo
Abu Dhabi
Acre State
Adelie Land (to S. Pole)
Admiralty Islands (Manus)
Adygeya
Afghanistan
Aguascalientes
Ajaria
Ajman
Alabama
Alagoas
Aland Islands
Alaska
Albania
Alberta
Alderney
Algeria
Alsace
Altai Krai
Altai Republic
Amapa State
Amazonas, Brazil
American Samoa
Amirante Islands
Amsterdam Island (and St. Paul)
Amur Oblast
Anatolia (Turkey in Asia)
Andalusia
Andaman Islands
Andhra Pradesh
Andorra
Angola (other)
Anguilla
Anhui
Anjouan
Antigua
Antipodes Islands
Aosta Valley
Appenzell Ausserrhoden
Appenzell Innerrhoden
Apulia
Aquitaine
Aragon
Argentine Antarctica (to S. Pole)
Arizona
Arkansas
Arkhangelsk Oblast
Armenia (other)
Aruba
Arunachal Pradesh
Ascension Island
Ashmore and Cartier Islands
Assam
Astrakhan Oblast
Asturias
Auckland Islands
Austral Islands
Australian Antarctic Territory (to S. Pole)
Australian Capital Territory
Austria
Auvergne
Aves Island
Azad Jammu and Kashmir
Azerbaijan (other)
Azores
Baden-Wurttemberg
Bahamas
Bahia
Bahrain
Baja California
Baja California Sur
Balearic Islands
Bangladesh
Barbados
Barbuda
Basel Landschaft
Basel Stadt
Bashkortostan
Basilicata
Bavaria
Beijing (District)
Belarus
Belgorod Oblast
Belize
Benin
Berlin
Bermuda
Bern
Bhutan
Bihar
Bioko Island (Malabo)
Bolivia
Bonaire
Botswana
Bougainville Province
Bounty Islands
Bouvet Island
Brandenburg
Brazilian Federal District
Bremen
British Antarctic Territory (to S. Pole)
British Columbia
British Indian Ocean Territory
British Virgin Islands
Brittany
Brunei
Brussels-Capital Region
Bryansk Oblast
Buenos Aires (City)
Buenos Aires Province
Bulgaria
Burgundy
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Buryatia
Busingen
Cabinda Province
Caicos Islands
Calabria
California
Cambodia
Cameroon
Campania
Campbell Islands
Campeche
Campione d'Italia
Canary Islands
Cantabria
Cape Verde
Carriacou and Petite Martinique
Castile and Leon
Castile-La Mancha
Catalonia
Catamarca Province
Cayman Islands
Ceara
Central African Republic
Centre
Ceuta
Chaco Province
Chad
Champagne-Ardenne
Chandigarh
Chatham Islands
Chelyabinsk Oblast
Chhattisgarh
Chiapas
Chihuahua
Chile (mainland)
Chilean Antarctic Territory (to S. Pole)
Chongqing (District)
Christmas Island
Chubu Region
Chubut Province
Chugoku Region
Chukotka Autonomous Okrug
Chuuk State
Chuvashia
Coahuila
Cocos (Keeling) Islands
Colima
Colombia (mainland)
Colorado
Connecticut
Cook Islands (Southern)
Cordoba Province
Corn Islands
Corrientes Province
Corsica
Costa Rica (mainland)
Crete
Crimea
Croatia (other)
Crozet Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Cyclades
Czech Republic
Dadra and Nagar Haveli
Dagestan
Daito Islands
Daman and Diu
Delaware
Delhi (NCT)
Denmark
Desecheo Island
District of Columbia
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Dodecanese Islands
Dominica
Dominican Republic
DRC (Zaire)
Dry Tortugas
Dubai
Durango
East Timor (other)
Easter Island
Eastern Cape
Ecuador (Mainland)
El Salvador
Emilia-Romagna
England
Entre Rios Province
Eritrea
Espirito Santo
Estonia
Ethiopia
Europa Island
Euskadi (Basque Country)
Extremadura
Falkland Islands
Faroe Islands
Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Fernando de Noronha
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Finland (mainland)
Flemish Region
Florida
Formosa Province
Franche-Comte
Free State
Free Zone (Sahrawi-Controlled)
French Guiana
Fribourg
Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Fujairah
Fujian
Gabon
Gagauzia
Galapagos Islands
Galicia
Gambia
Gambier Islands
Gansu
Gauteng
Gaza Strip
Geneva
Georgia, State
Ghana
Gibraltar
Gilbert Islands
Gilgit-Baltistan
Glarus
Glorioso Islands
Goa
Goias
Golan Heights
Grand Comoro
Graubunden
Greece (other)
Greenland
Grenada
Grenadines Parish
Guadeloupe (and Deps.)
Guam
Guanajuato
Guangdong
Guangxi
Guatemala
Guernsey
Guerrero
Guinea (Conakry)
Guinea-Bissau
Guizhou
Gujarat
Guyana
Hainan Island
Haiti
Hamburg
Haryana
Hawaiian Islands (including NW Islands)
Heard and McDonald Islands
Hebei
Heilongjiang
Helgoland
Henan
Herm
Hesse
Hidalgo
Himachal Pradesh
Hokkaido
Honduras (mainland)
Hong Kong
Hubei
Hunan
Hungary
Iceland
Idaho
Ile-de-France
Illinois
Indiana
Ingushetia
Inner Mongolia
Ionian Islands
Iowa
Iran
Iraq
Ireland, Republic of
Irian Jaya
Irkutsk Oblast
Islamabad Capital Territory
Islas de la Bahia
Isle of Man
Israel (other)
Istria
ITU (HQ - Geneva)
Ivanovo Oblast
Ivory Coast
Jalisco
Jamaica
Jammu and Kashmir (except Ladakh)
Jarvis Island
Java
Jeju Island
Jersey
Jewish Autonomous Oblast
Jharkhand
Jiangsu
Jiangxi
Jilin
Johnston Atoll
Jordan
Juan de Nova Island
Juan Fernandez Islands
Jujuy Province
Jura
Kabardino-Balkaria
Kalimantan
Kaliningrad
Kalmykia
Kaluga Oblast
Kamchatka Krai
Kansai Region
Kansas
Kanto Region
Karachay-Cherkessia
Karelia Republic
Karnataka
Kazakhstan
Kemerovo Oblast
Kentucky
Kenya
Kerala
Kerguelen Islands
Kermadec Islands
Khabarovsk Krai
Khakassia
Khantia-Mansia
Kirov Oblast
Komi Republic
Korea, North
Korea, South (mainland)
Kosovo
Kosrae State
Kostroma Oblast
Krasnodar Krai
Krasnoyarsk Krai
Kurgan Oblast
Kursk Oblast
Kuwait
Kwazulu-Natal
Kyrgyzstan
Kyushu Region
La Pampa Province
La Rioja
La Rioja Province
Labrador
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Lakshadweep
Languedoc-Roussillon
Laos
Latvia
Lazio
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Leningrad Oblast
Lesotho
Lesser Sunda Islands
Liaoning
Liberia
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